Simple Roasted Chicken Leg Quarters with Caramelized Fennel and Onions Served Over Sourdough Dressing - A Sheet Pan with a Plan #Sponsored by @OXO

In the midst of holiday over indulgence, sometimes it's nice to sit down to a simple meal that won't leave you feeling guilty. Today we're partnering with OXO to bring you one of our favorites: roasted chicken leg quarters, served over sourdough dressing. We've paired it with some of our favorite fresh, seasonal vegetables—fennel and yellow onions, which have been lightly careamelized to perfection. It's the type of meal that will be on the table in under an hour, making it perfect for a busy week night or last minute guests. Added bonus: the dressing is a great way to use up that loaf of bread you bought, but forgot about (or the heels that no one ever eats.)

DISCLOSURE:  Today's post was sponsored by OXO as part of the Sheet Pan with a Plan Campaign, through the blogger outreach program. They have provided me with a set of tools for evaluation, but no other compensation was given for this post. 

DISCLOSURE: Today's post was sponsored by OXO as part of the Sheet Pan with a Plan Campaign, through the blogger outreach program. They have provided me with a set of tools for evaluation, but no other compensation was given for this post. 

Chicken Leg Quarters
 

with Fennel and Onions


makes approximately 2 - 3 servings



 

Ingredients


1 fennel bulb, thinly sliced
1 yellow onion, thinly sliced
1 - 2 tablespoons salted butter, melted
sea salt and pepper, to taste

2 - 3 chicken leg quarters
2 tablespoons salted butter, melted
1/4 teaspoon smoked paprika
garlic sea salt and fresh ground black pepper, to taste

4 cups stale sourdough bread, torn into chunks
1/2 cup yellow onion, finely diced
1/2 cup celery, finely diced  
3 tablespoons salted butter
1/2 teaspoon poultry seasoning
3/4 cup chicken stock
sea salt and fresh ground black pepper, to taste
 

Directions
 

 

  • Preheat oven to 400ºF. Slice the fennel and yellow onion into uniform pieces, brush with melted butter, then add sea salt and pepper. Toss the vegetables so the butter and seasonings are evenly distributed, then transfer the vegetables to one half of the baking sheet. You'll reserve the other half for the dressing and chicken.
  • In a large skillet add onion, celery, and butter. Cook for 5 minutes over medium heat, or until the celery is slightly tender. Add poultry seasoning, bread, and chicken stock, then mix until all of the liquid is incorporated. Do not add additional stock if you still have dry bread, the juices from the chicken will moisten the stuffing as it cooks.
  • Add salt and pepper to taste, then mix everything together. Transfer the finished stuffing to the second half of the sheet pan.
  • Place the chicken leg quarters on top of the dressing, brush with melted butter, then season generously with smoked paprika, garlic sea salt, and black pepper.
  • Bake uncovered for 45 minutes, making sure to stir the onions and fennel several times through the cooking process to keep them from burning along the edges. Once the stuffing is slightly brown on the edges and the onions have caramelized, remove from the oven and check that the chicken has cooked throughly. You can use a quick-read thermometer to ensure that it has cooked to 165ºF, or poke with a fork and make sure that the juices run clear. If they're still pink, just pop the chicken back in the oven for a few more minutes.
     

Notes

 

If you have time you'll want to lay your bread out the night before making this recipe so it will have time to dry out. I'm lazy about planning, so I put mine on a baking sheet, then let it sit on the counter until I'm ready to use it. If you decide to make this recipe at the last minute you can always bake your bread for 10 - 20 minutes at 200ºF to help dry it out a little faster.

The amount of chicken stock you'll need can vary, so make sure to have extra on hand. If your stuffing comes out of the oven on the dry side you can always add a little bit of extra stock to moisten it up. 
 

DISCLOSURE:  Today's post was sponsored by OXO as part of the Sheet Pan with a Plan Campaign, through the blogger outreach program. They have provided me with a set of tools for evaluation, but no other compensation was given for this post. 

DISCLOSURE: Today's post was sponsored by OXO as part of the Sheet Pan with a Plan Campaign, through the blogger outreach program. They have provided me with a set of tools for evaluation, but no other compensation was given for this post. 

Tools


To facilitate today's recipe OXO sent along a handful nifty kitchen items. Keep reading for more information on the tools featured in our post today and where you can purchase them.

Chef's Precision Digital Instant Read Thermometer: The Instant Read Thermometer provides quick, accurate measurements for cooked meat. The pivoting head allows reading temperature from any angle.  Purchase from Amazon or OXO

Silicone Roasting Rack - Elevates food above fat and liquid for healthier cooking and allows air to circulate around food for faster, more even roasting. Purchase from Amazon or OXO

Non-Stick Pro Half Sheet Jelly Roll Pan - Square-rolled edges add reinforcement for structure, strength and durability. Purchase from Amazon or OXO

Flavor Injector Inject marinades and other flavorings into meat for delicious flavor and juiciness. Two needles for thick and thin marinades store inside injector tube when not in use. Purchase from Amazon or OXO

Good Gravy Fat Separator (not pictured) - Easily separates the fat for healthier gravies, soups and sauces. Purchase from Amazon or OXO
 

Disclosure


Today's post was sponsored by OXO as part of the Sheet Pan with a Plan Campaign. They have provided me with a set of tools for evaluation, but no other compensation was given for this post. 

This post contains my Amazon affiliate links. I try to keep advertising unobtrusive and to a minimum in order to provide you with the best experience possible. Purchases made through these links provide me with a small income and ensure I can continue providing you with quality content.

Chestnut Stuffing

I'm pretty sure numerous wars have been fought at the dinner table over which type of stuffing (or dressing) reins supreme and with so many varieties to choose from, it really isn't any surprise that my family frequently finds itself debating their various merits. Personally, I've always been a fan of my grandmother's mushy breadcrumb dressing, but mine never tastes quite as good as hers, so I decided it was time to start the painful process of coming up with my own recipe. I've spent years cycling through various styles—sausage stuffing, cornbread dressing, variations on bread stuffing—I've tried them all (well, except oyster stuffing since it would cause me to stop breathing forever... stupid shellfish allergy.) It took me roughly 6 years of rejecting recipes before I finally discovered chestnut dressing and I haven't tried another recipe since.

What I love is that this recipe has a fairly simple ingredient list made up of things I typically keep in the pantry, plus it's flexible and can be dressed up to suite a variety of tastes. I've added additional things like fennel, pancetta, or fresh herbs—just to change things up a bit, but it's perfectly tasty just as it's written. It's been served alongside deep-fried turkey, honey-roasted ham, and most recently whole roast duck. It's always the first thing to disappear from the table, so if you want to have leftovers you'll need to make a double batch.

Chestnut Stuffing | Not Starving Yet

 

Chestnut Stuffing
 

makes 6 - 8 servings

Ingredients

1lb loaf stale sourdough bread, torn into chunks
1 small yellow onion, diced
2 - 3 stalks celery, diced  
1 small shallot, finely diced
1 stick salted butter
1/2 tablespoon poultry seasoning
1 1/2 cup chicken stock
13 ounce package peeled chestnuts, roughly chopped
sea salt and fresh ground black pepper, to taste

Directions

  • Preheat oven to 350ºF. In a large skillet add onion, celery, shallots, and butter. Cook for 5 minutes over medium heat, or until the celery is tender. Add poultry seasoning, bread, and chicken stock, then mix until all of the liquid is incorporated. Add additional stock as necessary if you still have dry bread or want your stuffing to be more moist.
  • Chop or crumble the chestnuts, add salt and pepper to taste, then mix everything together.  Transfer the finished stuffing to a baking dish. Bake uncovered for 20 - 30 minutes or until the stuffing is slightly brown on top.

Notes

You'll want to lay your bread out several days before making this recipe so it will have time to dry out. I put mine on a cookie sheet, then let it sit in the oven for at least two days. If I need to use the oven I toss it on the counter while I'm cooking and put it back in the oven once it has cooled off. If you decide to make stuffing at the last minute you can always bake your bread for 20 - 30 minutes, then let it cool off before you tear it into chunks.

The amount of chicken stock you'll need can vary, so make sure to have extra on hand. If your stuffing comes out of the oven a little dry you can always add a little bit of extra stock to moisten it up a bit. Just remember not to add cool or room temperature liquid to a hot ceramic or glass baking dish as it can cause thermal shock. This will break your dish and render your stuffing inedible (because no one wants to accidentally munch on glass shards.)

Chestnuts can be hard to come by, if you can't find them at your local supermarket talk to someone in customer service and most times they'll be happy to order them for you. Otherwise, check out your local asian market, many of them carry chestnuts year around.

Creamy Summer Coleslaw

I know things have been slow around here since I returned from my trip, but I've been taking advantage of the gorgeous weather we've been having. I have a hard time spending my time in the kitchen slaving over a hot stove when I could be outside eating popsicles and running through the sprinkler with my son. What can I say, even at the ripe old age of 31 I'm still a kid at heart. Besides, who doesn't love a good popsicle on a hot summer day? Hopefully over the next week or so I can catch up, I have some wonderful summertime recipes to share with you and today's recipe just happens to be one of them.

I tend to make a ton of coleslaw this time of year, it's my go-to side whenever we're invited to a summer pot luck or have a backyard BBQ. This version has the perfect balance of sweet, tangy, and crunchy making it a favorite with all of our friends. If you're looking for something quick and easy to throw together then this is your dish. It comes together in a snap, but keep in mind that it is best when refrigerated overnight. 

Coleslaw.jpg

Coleslaw
makes approximately 6 servings

1 16oz package classic coleslaw mix
¼ small yellow onion, finely minced
¼ cup white sugar
½ cup buttermilk
½ cup mayonnaise
1 Tablespoon rice vinegar
1 Tablespoon lemon juice
½ teaspoon kosher salt
fresh ground black pepper, to taste

Directions

  • In a large bowl combine sugar, buttermilk, mayonnaise, rice vinegar, lemon juice, kosher salt, and pepper. Blend until smooth and set aside.
  • Finely mince the onion before adding it to the coleslaw mix. Top with dressing and stir well to combine.
  • Coleslaw is best when made in advance so the flavors of the dressing have time to blend together so make sure to refrigerate this dish overnight.

Russian Dressing

Several years ago during one of my many road trips, I stopped off at a deli for a Reuben and was completely blown away by the flavor packed into my sandwich. It was the best Reuben I'd ever had, miles ahead of anything that had previously crossed my lips and I've eaten a fair amount of Reubens in my time. It was a slow day in the shop so I spend a good 20 minutes talking with the owner trying to pin down what was so different about this particular sandwich. He proudly told me that what made his sandwich the best was the fact that everything was made from scratch in house except for the cheese which was locally made by a family friend. He went into great detail about the process of curing the corned beef, fermenting the sauerkraut, and how easy it was to make the dressing from scratch. During our talk you could tell that he enjoyed his craft and took enjoyment from the looks of ecstasy that crossed his customer's faces as they took their first bite.

From our conversation I took away several things, first of all I wanted to try to make my own corned beef some day and second, I was going to stop buying commercially prepared salad dressing. Before that conversation I never stopped to think about how easy it would be to make my own, I just picked up a bottle of Hidden Valley Ranch whenever it was on sale and never gave it a second though. I'm pretty sure my love of convenience foods came to an end in the weeks following this conversation, as I realized what I had been missing out on. One of the first dressings I decided to tackle was Russian dressing, since as you can tell, I love a good Reuben and often make them at home. Not only is this dressing great on a Reuben, it's perfect on top of an ordinary salad to make it a little more interesting and it's a necessity for the Reuben salad recipe that I will be posting soon as part of our what to do with the leftover series.

RussianDressing.jpg

Ingredients

1 cup mayonnaise
¼ cup ketchup
1 teaspoon onion, minced
1 teaspoon horseradish
1 teaspoon dill pickle, minced
¼ teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
2 teaspoons parsley, dried
¼ teaspoon smoked paprika
¼ teaspoon fresh ground black pepper 

Directions

  • In a bowl combine mayonnaise, ketchup, minced onion, horseradish, minced dill pickle, Worcestershire sauce, dried parsley, paprika, and black pepper. Mix well and refrigerate at least two hours before serving to allow the flavors to combine.

Recipe Inspiration

Adapted from a Russian Dressing recipe from food.com