Using Up Food Scraps: Cherry Pit Vinegar #CanItForward

I've been canning for years, but until recently I hadn't given much though to the peels and pits from my yearly harvest. When I was done with whatever project I was working on I tossed all my scraps in the compost and moved on. It wasn't until I was reading through Alice Water's latest book My Pantry: Homemade Ingredients That Make Simple Meals Your Own that I even realized I could turn these leftover bits and pieces into something else.

After a marathon canning session in which I made cherry vanilla applesauce, Cherry Liqueur, and Cherry Almond Preserves I have no shortage of cherry pits to work with which is why my first project ended up being cherry pit vinegar. It's a flexible pantry staple that can be used to create a flavorful vinaigrette, but has a multitude of other uses. Plus, if you're looking for DIY gifts for the holiday season it's festive red color makes it an excellent choice.

Don't forget to check out the rest of our canning section for more great recipes.

Using Up Food Scraps: Cherry Pit Vinegar | Not Starving Yet

Cherry Pit Vinegar

 

Ingredients


cherry pits, whole
apple cider vinegar or other vinegar of your choice
 

Directions
 

 

  • Place cherry pits and excess juice in a sterilized glass jar, add enough vinegar so the pits are completely submerged, then cover. Allow the mixture to sit for at least a week in a dark place, taking care to shake the jar occasionally. If you notice your pits have floated to the top, don't worry, it's all a part of the process.

  • After seven days removed the pits and strain the vinegar through a piece of cheese cloth to remove any solids. Store the cherry vinegar in a sealed jar in a cool, dark place.

Notes


While the acidic nature of vinegar generally prevents harmful bacteria such as botulism from growing it is still best to properly sterilize any equipment you'll be using for this project so other forms of bacteria aren't introduced.

It's not a well known fact, but stone fruit seeds do contain small amounts of cyanide. This is why it's important you only use uncracked pits, so the seed inside does not come into contact with the vinegar. If you're concerned that the cyanide may leach into the vinegar you can always use pitted cherries to flavor your vinegar.