Apple Cider Syrup #Unprocessed

Since our trip to the pumpkin patch earlier in the month I've had apple cider doughnuts on my mind. Even if they are made from scratch, they aren't considered unprocessed so I wondered if I could make a less processed version at home. I've been in recipe development mode all week trying to get the right balance of flavors, but while the doughnuts taste good, they aren't great — yet. I'm ready for a short break from this project so I thought I would put the recipe on the back burner for now and move on, but I didn't want to leave you without a recipe of some sort.

It just so happens that another recipe came out of all of my kitchen experiments and it happens to be an unprocessed sweetener. Apple cider syrup isn't something I was familiar with, but I stumbled across it on the King Arthur Flour website and thought, hey I bet I could make that. It's really quite simple, you take a half gallon of unsweetened apple cider and boil it down until it thickens. The resulting syrup is incredibly sweet and can be used as a topping for pancakes or an addition to baked goods to give them more apple flavor. It's quite versatile and has the added benefit of making your entire house smell like autumn.

Apple Cider Syrup
makes approximately 8 ounces or a half-pint

Ingredients

½ gallon fresh apple cider *see notes

Directions

  • In a large pot bring the apple cider to a boil, then reduce the heat to medium-high. Continue to simmer the cider for approximately 2 hours or until it has reduced in half. 
  • If you accidentally cook your cider down more than you had intended you can save it, just add a small amount of apple cider back into the syrup, stir until well combined and cook down more if necessary.
  • This recipe can be stored in the refrigerator for several months or canned using a water-bath. Pint, half-pint, and quarter-pint jars will be processed for 15 minutes. For complete canning instructions you can visit my Crock-Pot Applesauce recipe the process is identical.

Notes

If you're looking to use this as a natural sweetener you'll want to use an apple cider that doesn't contain preservatives or other added ingredients. Many of the varieties sold in the store contain Potassium Sorbate or Sodium Benzoate, which is used as a preservative. I purchased a gallon of cider from one of our local farms that is unfiltered, unsweetened, and has no preservatives.