Classic Deviled Eggs

I've seen quite a few variations on deviled eggs, but I don't think I've enjoyed the modern versions nearly as much as the classic style that I grew up with. They're the perfect combination of sweet, creamy, and tangy—and if I'm honest, eating just one makes me wish I could sit there and devour an entire tray without feeling like a glutton. 

What is it about the combination of mayonnaise, sweet relish, and yellow mustard that makes these so good? I have no idea, but there is a good reason why these classic eggs have been turning up at our family events for longer than I've been alive.

So, if you're looking for something that is sure to be a hit at your next BBQ, potluck, or family gathering consider making up a double batch of these eggs. They're only five ingredients, many of which you likely already have on hand, and they barely take any time to toss together—leaving you with more time to concentrate on the important things in life that happen outside of the kitchen.

Classic Deviled Eggs | Not Starving Yet

Classic Deviled Eggs


makes 1 dozen


Ingredients

6 large eggs, hard boiled and peeled
3 tablespoons mayonnaise
1 tablespoon sweet pickle relish, drained
1 tablespoon yellow mustard
sweet paprika, to taste

Directions

  • Cut each egg in half using a non-serrated knife, then use a spoon to carefully scoop out the hardened yolk into your food processor. Add mayonnaise, sweet relish, and yellow mustard, then pulse until smooth. 
  • Transfer the egg mixture to a disposable pastry bag, then slowly fill the eggs. Finish each egg off with a pinch of paprika, then refrigerate until ready to serve.

Notes

For a more polished looking presentation I prefer to use a pastry bag and metal icing tip when filling the eggs, but in a pinch you can use a ziplock bag with the corner cut off. If you don't happen to have either on hand you can fill the eggs the old fashioned way—with a spoon.

Transporting deviled eggs can be a bit of a challenge, so I typically store mine in an egg container from Snapware. I love the two-tier design because I can set half the eggs out on the table while refrigerating the other half until they're needed (or in the rare instance that someone doesn't devour all the eggs I know that the remaining half can safely be taken home so I can eat them.)

Not sure how to hard boil an egg? Don't worry, it's a simple, mostly hands-off process. Place your eggs in a saucepan and fill it with cold water. You want the eggs to be covered by an inch or two, so don't fill the pan to the top. Turn the heat on high and bring the water to a rolling boil. Once the water has reached a rolling boil shut the heat off, cover the saucepan, and set a timer for 10 minutes. When the timer goes off transfer the eggs to a bowl of ice water to stop the cooking process. Let them sit in the ice water until they're cool to the touch (usually 2 - 3 minutes is enough), dry them off throughly, and allow them to finish cooling in the refrigerator. If your eggs aren't completely cooled you'll have a lot of trouble peeling them, which is why I prefer to boil the eggs ahead of time. Last minute egg boiling always leads to deviled eggs that are missing huge chunks of the white, so learn from my impatience: Boil your eggs the night before!

Disclosure
 


This post contains my Amazon affiliate links. I try to keep advertising unobtrusive and to a minimum in order to provide you with the best experience possible. Purchases made through these links provide me with a small income and ensure I can continue providing you with quality content.

Vanilla Bean Infused Peach Slices #fijchallenge #CanItForward

Just shortly after I returned from Ireland a friend let me in on a little secret: There were some excellent blueberries to be had in town and if I was lucky the person selling them may just have some plump Georgia pecans too. Unfortunately by the time I managed to get out the door the pecans were all gone, but I lucked out and in addition to my blueberries I was able to bring home a bushel of over-ripe Georgia peaches for half off. Never one to pass up a deal, especially on peaches, I happily handed over my hard earned money and spent the next few days finding creative ways to preserve them.

And then I ran out of steam... What was I thinking buying 48 pounds of peaches?

After making two cases of pie filling in a variety of flavors and playing around with a new flavor of peach applesauce I decided to cut my creative endeavors short. Everything I had left got sliced up and preserved with a vanilla bean infused syrup, which just may be one of the simplest ways to preserve peaches. 

Vanilla Bean Infused Peach Slices | Not Starving Yet

Vanilla Bean Infused Peaches


makes 9 pints


Ingredients

6½ cups water
¾ cup sugar
4½ vanilla beans, cut in half and sliced down the center (see notes)
11 pounds yellow peaches
Lots of ice, to help with peeling

Directions

  • Before beginning, sterilize your jars and rings in the dishwasher. As per the new canning guidelines lids no longer need to be sterilized if they'll be in the water bath for more than 10 minutes.
  • Prepare a light syrup made of water and sugar in a large saucepan, bring the mixture to a boil, and stir until the sugar dissolves. Add the vanilla beans to the hot syrup, turn off the heat, and allow the vanilla beans to infuse while you peel your peaches.
  • Dip the peaches in a large pot of boiling water for 30 - 60 seconds, or until the skins start to loosen. Quickly drop the peaches in a bowl of ice water and slip the skins off. Cut the peaches in half, remove the pit, then slice into equal-sized pieces. 
  • Add the peach slices to the sugar syrup and bring to a boil. Fill your sterilized jars with fruit and a slice of vanilla bean. Once the jars are full add syrup, making sure to leave ½ inch headspace at the top of the jar. 
  • Tap the jars gently to remove any air bubbles that may have become trapped, wipe the rims of the jars to remove any access syrup, then add a new canning lid. Make sure to tighten the ring securely before placing the jars in a boiling water bath for 20 minutes (pint jars) or 25 minutes (quart jars.)
  • Remove the jars from the water bath and set them on a dish towel to cool. After the jars have cooled completely check the seals and refrigerate any jars that do not have a good seal.

Notes

I have occasionally run out of syrup when canning peaches, but it's easy to make more as needed without making up a full batch of syrup. 1 cup of water, 2 tablespoons of sugar, and ½ a vanilla bean is usually enough to fill the last jar should you run out. Any extra syrup can be refrigerated and used later, as long as you remember to bring the refrigerated syrup to a full boil.

If you want to put up a large amount of peaches I suggest trying to find the freestone variety, the pits practically fall out when you cut the peaches in half which saves a surprising amount of time. 

Lemon Pound Cake

I like cake. It doesn't matter what flavor—chocolate, vanilla, strawberry, salted caramel—I enjoy them all, but I'm especially fond of lemon pound cake. This is largely due to its simplicity as it's one of those rare cakes that doesn't need to be drowned in frosting to make it delicious. A thick slice coupled with a cup of coffee (or better yet some vanilla bean ice cream) has the power to make even the worst day a little brighter.

The trouble is, I don't often find myself with enough time for baking.

The good news is that pound cake can be made in advance and the flavor only improves as the days go by. I've been known to make one of these cakes, enjoy a small piece, then save the rest for a rainy day (or for those last minute guests that tend to turn up at my table on a regular basis.)

If you want my advice, if life hands you lemons don't waste them on lemonade, make a pound cake instead. Cake makes everything better.

Lemon Pound Cake

Lemon Pound Cake


makes 1 loaf


1½ cups sugar
2 sticks salted butter, room temperature
2 tablespoons lemon zest
4 large eggs
¾ cup buttermilk
2 tablespoons lemon juice
2 cups all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon baking powder
½ teaspoon salt

Directions

  • Preheat oven to 350°F. Butter the insides of a loaf pan, line the bottom with parchment paper and set it aside.
  • In a mixing bowl cream together sugar and room temperature butter. Add lemon zest, eggs, buttermilk, and lemon juice then continue to mix until well incorporated. 
  • In a separate bowl combine flour, baking powder, and salt. Add the dry mixture to the wet ingredients and mix until smooth.
  • Transfer the batter to the greased loaf pan and bake for 65 - 75 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted into the center of the cake comes away clean.
  • Allow the cake to cool in the pan for at least 10 minutes before removing to a cooling rack. Cool in the pan for 10 minutes before removing to a cake platter or plate.

Notes


 

Loaf pans come in several different sizes, for this recipe you'll need a 1.5lb loaf pan like this one from Nordic Ware.

This cake is tasty when paired with ice cream (I'm partial to lemon and lavender or vanilla bean) but it's also quite good eaten on its own or topped with sliced strawberries and fresh whipped cream.
 

Disclosure
 


This post contains my Amazon affiliate links. I try to keep advertising unobtrusive and to a minimum in order to provide you with the best experience possible. Purchases made through these links provide me with a small income and ensure I can continue providing you with quality content.